All-Star Player

Also from Issue 64

  • 1962 Restomod
  • Buyer’s Guide: C3
  • Corvette Pace Cars
  • 1995 Pace Car
  • Inside Bowling Green
  • 1967 Coupe
  • Racing: Dan Binks
  • 1968 coupe
  • How-To: Power brakes
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Consulting with Mosello and Gjokaj, while contemplating the addition of new bits and pieces, became a regular ritual for Hight. It’s worth noting that the transformation on his car didn’t happen overnight. He didn’t cut a check for a pile of parts to be installed in one shot. He took the advice given by both shops and moved very slowly and cautiously with each modification. The transformation process lasted four years.

For the exterior, Hight was particularly fond of the raw carbon-fiber look. As a result, Gjokaj suggested a variety of parts that would complement the C6’s already aggressive looks. The bolt-on pieces ended up being sourced from a variety of different suppliers. The front splitter and rear diffuser were purchased from Advanced Composite Products, while the rear spoiler came from Katech. The side skirts came from APR Performance. The roof’s halo panel, along with the carbon-fiber wheels, was fabricated in-house by Proformance.

Hight liked the C6RS that Pratt & Miller built for Jay Leno, particularly the wheels. He wanted a set, but decided the design’s center-lock lug would be too impractical for regular street use, as it requires a special tool. Gjokaj is a master at creating custom wheels for his customers, so he ended up designing a set that looked nearly identical to the ones used on Leno’s C6RS, but with a traditional five-lug pattern.

The design process for these wheels, which feature an alloy core and a carbon-fiber rim, began on the computer, then moved to a milling machine for the creation of a prototype. Gjokaj subjected the prototype to a rigorous stress analysis test; over two tons of lateral and radial pressure was applied to verify its structural integrity. Once tests was complete, a full set of finished wheels was created.

Wider and taller than stock, the front wheels measure 10 × 19 inches; the rears are also larger, at 12 × 20 inches. Hight chose to wrap them with ContiExtremeContact DWs, 275/30ZR19 front and 325/25ZR20 rear.

On the mechanical side, Hight was especially cautious with each upgrade decision. He wanted an engine that produced more power without sacrificing real-world drivability. Mosello suggested that the first step should be to improve the Z06’s ability to inhale and exhale.

To reduce back pressure, the stock exhaust was replaced with a Borla Stinger setup. That was followed with the addition of a Vararam Snake Charmer cold-air intake, which was actually not available for the Z06 at the time; Mosello had to fabricate an adapter. “I developed the ‘MAF Bridge,’ which allowed Vararam to use their intakes on the new C6 Z06,” says Mosello. “At the time, no manufacturer offered any cold-air intakes for the Z06, as the vehicle was still very new and production numbers were limited. On Hight’s car, I installed one of the first three prototypes. I hand-made each piece and, after testing a few of them, the prototype eventually evolved into the ‘MAF Adapter’ that Vararam currently uses, and so many other vendors have copied.” Also added were a set of LG Motorsports Pro Long Tube Headers. After all these bits were installed, Mosello performed a dyno tune. The result was just under 550 horsepower at the rear wheels.

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